Patches of Epiphanies {2}

It is very difficult nowadays to come across that rare moment of clarity, that dawning of comprehension, about what really is and what we are about. We are swimming in a deluge of noise and we try our hardest to avoid surfacing to silence. We find it hard to think, just shut up and think, because we preoccupy our minds with blabber. There’s not much time left to question and seek for answers about the world, the enormity of life, as we are too busy with the everyday tasks we put upon ourselves. There’s not much space left to allow discovery of the essential, the learning and understanding of the truth since we are too filled with trivial things. To find someone who is open to queries about the state of society or someone who will not dismiss a lengthy discussion about ideas and insights is to find a grain of sand among the rocks.

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Pass it on

I have always been baffled by how society works. In my solitude I often ponder on why certain things happen and how people think or act this way or the other. Asking questions has always been a past time when my brain is not occupied and seeking to understand has been an obsession. But there are times, genuine times, that I discover actual answers to the questions that I have barely formed in my head. These tiny pieces of revelation come in different forms – a short story, a novel, an essay, a film, a picture, a song – and the feeling of fulfillment in this unearthing is very compelling, it pushes me to write about it, to share the bit of precious insight.

The people behind these inspiring lessons have done more than enough in being able to substantiate and illustrate the most difficult issues to explain. The matters that most of us fear to touch because we are unable to make sense of them, as doubt or apathy sometimes beleaguer us, are brilliantly portrayed by these people. So in my gratitude to them, to give their work due credit and to further the purpose of their creation, I pass them on to you.

One of the ingenuities I recently stumbled on is this short film about a new kind of revolution, narrated by Charles Eisenstein, author of Sacred Economics, directed by Ian MacKenzie.

“This is not crazy. This makes sense. This is how to live.”

This second film is about the shift of civilization towards a world that is not oppressive but rather fosters a sustainable way of living.

“It is really up to us to determine at what point this wake-up point will happen.”

If you’re also searching for answers and seeking to learn more about life and the world around us, or perhaps pursuing the change you’ve been longing for, these sites might be of help: Curious, very curious